Here is the number of walks and hikes (with or without your canine friends) that we have walked over the years and have a first hand experience of. We are focusing more on the local area of Greenlaw but there are some that are outside of the village and worth mentioning. At the bottom of this page you will find a list of link to various walking websites you might want to check out and the general list of local activities with dates when you should take an extra care whilst waking. And remember – clean up after your dog and dispose of you own litter. Thank you!

Happer's Woodland - Greenlaw

Although Greenlaw’s Happer Memorial Woodland mainly features a football pitch (Greenlaw FC), it is surrounded by a woodland walk and bordered by the Blackadder River on the right hand side. It is a small area, just below 9 acres, but perfect size for the short dog walks or short impromptu football matches. The dogs and children can be unleashed and it is only a short walk away from the cottage.

Old Railway Track - Greenlaw

This is a nice length walk which starts at the edge of the village and follows the Blackadder River for 1-2 km and then turns into a small road winding back to Greenlaw. The dogs can be off lead, however we strongly recommend to have them on the lead or under a tighter control when walking back to Greenlaw on the road. It is a small road and it is not busy but you will occasionally get a car coming one way or the other.

The Glebe - Greenlaw

This walks is purely for the dog lovers and is in fact frequented and loved by such. It is just a field that you can walk around and have your dog off lead. Once you get to the field you will straight away see the path which you can follow whichever way you fancy. It is circular walk and will always bring you back to the starting point. Wellies are recommended!

Gordon Community Woodland

Gordon Community Woodland is just 5 minutes drive from Greenlaw towards Gordon village on A6105. This large community woodland of over 200 acres has a pond, a cabin, a river, old burial mounds and a disused railway line as well as lots of trees. It is criss-crossed by well trodden paths and definitely favoured by dog walkers. You can spend as little or as long in this friendly woodland.

The Eildons - Melrose

The three shapely summits of the Eildon Hills are an iconic part of the Scottish Borders landscape They make for a fine half-day hillwalk from the attractive town of Melrose. The views from their tops are stunning allowing the observer on a clear day to look out to the Lammermuirs, Moorfoots and Upper Tweeddale Hills. This hike/walk has steep sections so be ready. It can take up to 3-4 hours to tackle all 3 hills and it can be incredibly muddy.

The Cheviots - Kirk Yetholm

The Cheviots are only 30 minutes away from Greenlaw and are famous for hill walking. These beautiful rolling hills run between Northumberland and Scottish Borders. ‘The Cheviot’ is the highest point in the Northumberland National Park at 815 metres. When compared with the Pennines these hills appear low but no less spectacular. Definitely a worthwhile visit at any time of the year.

<a href=”http://<a href=”http://www.walkscottishborders.com”>http://www.walkscottishborders.com</a>”>www.walkingscottishborders.co.uk</a>
<a href=”http://www.scotborders.gov.uk/info/20032/parks_and_outdoors/632/walking”>http://www.scotborders.gov.uk/info/20032/parks_and_outdoors/632/walking</a>

<a href=”http://www.scotborders.gov.uk/info/20032/parks_and_outdoors/632/walking”>http://www.scotborders.gov.uk/info/20032/parks_and_outdoors/632/walking</a>

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